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Where to go for funding

There is a range of funding sources you can apply to. Each funder is different in terms of where, what, when and how it funds. Many funders also provide helpful resources you can use to help you prepare your application for funding.

Lists of funding sources

Generosity New Zealand

This service provides information and a comprehensive list of funders. It includes GivUS, GivME and GivER. You normally need a paid subscription to access GivUs, GivMe and GivER but you can access them for free at most public libraries and Disability Information Centres. Some libraries have access to the databases on their websites and so you can log in from offsite if you are a library member. 

GivUS: this database lists more than 1200 resource schemes for communities, volunteer organisations and clubs. You can search for a funder according to specific criteria such as region, type of cost and client group.
GivME: this database offers access to more than 4,000 scholarships and grants for individuals.

GivER: connects businesses with community groups to achieve positive social impacts. 

Cultural Funding Guide

The Ministry for Culture and Heritage’s website has a free online funding advice service, designed to help you find the best funding match for your project. It provides links to the Funding Information Service website for information on making a funding application. For more information, email the Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Lottery Community Sector Research fund 

Applications for funding to support community organisations' research and evaluation can be submitted to Lottery Community Sector Research throughout the year, Committee meets quarterly.  For information on check their website 

Philanthropic trusts and foundations

These are listed on GivUS and often have their own website. Do your homework first to ensure you’re eligible and that they fund costs you’re seeking funding for (e.g. some trusts don’t fund salaries).

National Foundation for the Deaf

The National Foundation for the Deaf promotes the interests of more than 700,000 Deaf and hearing impaired New Zealanders. The foundation’s trust was set up to invest legacies and investments given to it by the public. Trustees meet four times a year to decide how to distribute the money among the many applicants for scholarships, and grants for training and projects. Many of the grants are for Deaf and hearing impaired people but some funding is also available for people who work in hearing-related areas. Visit its website for more information and deadlines.

Gaming trusts

These distribute a portion of the income they receive from pokie machines. They tend to distribute the funding into the area in which it was spent. The Department of Internal Affairs website has a list of gaming societies that invite grants from the public and also some helpful advice on applying for grants. These trusts are often the quickest way to access funding. Most are open to applications all year round, can fund a range of costs, have straightforward application forms, and will respond to your application within two or three months.

Crowdfunding

Get funding support for your project from members of the community by listing it on a crowdfunding website.

Boosted: supporting arts projects

Boosted is a philanthropic crowdfunding website set up by The Arts Foundation in 2013. It’s aimed at supporting arts projects in New Zealand. Donors to Boosted projects are eligible for tax rebates of 33 per cent of their donations.

Pledgeme

Pledgeme is a New Zealand crowdfunding platform that supports the funding of creative projects.

In-kind sponsorship

Business sponsorship

Businesses may provide in-kind goods or services. This is a way for them to fulfil their corporate social responsibility and maintain a positive image and presence in the community: for example, a website developer adapting your website to make it more accessible or a builder putting in a ramp. Do your homework before approaching businesses for in-kind support, and present a business case outlining the benefits for bot parties. Acknowledging the sponsor publicly is usually one of these benefits.

Individual giving

Look to individuals in your local community to contribute to something that will benefit their community. Let them know what you are seeking donations for (e.g. a ramp to enable wheelchair access) and this may motivate them to donate.

Local council funding

Each city or district council has different funding schemes. Check out your council’s website and then talk to a funding advisor to find out what funding stream would best suit your purpose and criteria.

Creative Communities Scheme: arts at a local level

This scheme is a partnership between Creative New Zealand and the 74 local authorities throughout New Zealand. It aims to increase participation in the arts at a local level, and increase the range and diversity of arts available to communities. Local decision-making is the key to the scheme and applications are considered by local assessment committees. All New Zealanders (individuals, groups and organisations) are eligible to apply. For funding guidelines and further information about the scheme, visit the Creative NZ Creative Communities webpage or contact your local council’s Creative Communities Scheme administrator.

Government agencies

Some government departments and agencies offer funding.

Department of Internal Affairs

The Department of Internal Affairs has a range of funding streams, including Lottery, Crown and Trust grants. Information, advice and applications for these funds can be found on its website.

Creative New Zealand

Creative New Zealand, the national arts development agency, offers a range of grants. Information, advice about eligibility and applications can be found on its website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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